Bilocation (Review)

 

“One would expect a great deal more from such a tantalizing premise, but the resulting narrative eventually falls back on hackneyed, more-of-same J-Horror”

 

 

 
by Nav Qateel

Based on Haruka Hojo’s novel of the same name, Bilocation tells the story of Shinobu Takamura, an amature artist who’s trying to turn pro. One day, she finds herself accused of passing counterfeit money but the cop who arrives to take her away isn’t what he seems. Instead of arresting Shinobu, Detective Takashi Kano takes her to meet with a small group of people who share her problem. They each have doppelganger entities known as “bilocations” who are actually exact copies of themselves, and these replicas try to insinuate themselves into the real person’s life. Bilocations appear and dissolve into black smoke without warning but always near their original. When Shinobu’s bilocation passes money at the same store Shinobu later uses, and thinking Shinobu’s returned, the suspicious clerk notices the serial numbers on the banknotes are identical and calls the cops. Thanks to this, Shinobu learns about the existence of bilocations and the mysterious group.

Bilocation
Directed by
Mari Asato
Cast
Asami Mizukawa, Kento Senga, Sho Takada, Kenichi Takito
DVD Release Date
17 July 2014
Nav’s Grade: C

One would expect a great deal more from such a tantalizing premise, but the resulting narrative eventually falls back on hackneyed, more-of-same J-Horror, rather than deliver the promised psychological thrills. Bilocation succeeds more in confusing the audience than anything else, but even with its substantial plot holes and silly science, we’re provided with enough entertainment to keep us mostly satisfied.

The characters who make up the self-help bilocation group are an eclectic and interesting bunch from all walks of life, but something stressful in their past has allowed their other self to come into being. Group newcomer Shinobu is worrying over an art competition she plans to enter, and she sees it as her last chance to show the world she has what it takes to make it as an artist. This is the catalyst that allows her bilocation to be created. Out of all the bilocations attached to the group, the most troublesome is Detective Kano’s (Kenichi Takito). His bilocation came about thanks to Kano being under constant pressure from an abusive superior, and now his alter ego is always very angry and violent towards the others in the group.


To aid with popularity, Bilocation boasts two J-pop stars, Kento Senga and Sho Takada, whose inclusion will only help sell the film to adoring girls, but beyond that, add little of significance. In the lead role playing a double character is the beautiful Asami Mizukawa. The experienced actress managed to perform the dual role with practiced ease, which is just as well because Mizukawa is signed on to recreate her character–along with the other survivors–in the follow-up, Bilocation Ura which is due out later this year.

A mystery surrounds group leader Makoto Iitsuka‎ (Kosuke Toyohara), and while he appears to be trying to keep Shinobu safe, he stands idly by as the others die off in various gruesome ways. When all motives are finally revealed, rather than feel a sense of closure or understanding, we’re only left with more questions. Not everything finally makes sense and even taking into account the ambiguous nature of some Japanese horror, a lot is left unanswered. The obvious questions are, why is it only this small group? How did they find each other in the first place? Why doesn’t the world know about their existence when the bilocations appear in front of others? And, of course, why aren’t the police involved? That’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Bilocation is very well made with good cinematography and production values. The CGI is perhaps typical but still competently handled and the cast do a great job with their characters. Director Mari Asato is certainly making a name for herself having studied under director Kiyoshi Kurosawa and The Ring writer Hiroshi Takahashi. There are too few Japanese women directing movies but Asato is holding her own in a male dominated business. I just hope the writing is improved when Asato helms the follow-up.

True Blood: Season 7, Episode 5 (Recap)

Lost Cause (Spoiler Warning)

This week’s episode of True Blood had a decent mix of everything, as one would expect at the midway point of the final season. It managed to cover all the bases in an attempt at pleasing everyone and at that it most definitely succeeded. As well as finally getting to see Eric with his hands wrapped around Sarah Newlin’s neck, there was the big surprise at learning Bill Compton is the latest victim of Hep-V. Now that Alcide has gone to the great kennel in the sky, with Eric and now Bill ready to purchase land fit for growing crops and raising livestock, Sookie is gonna be without someone to have sex with for the first time in ages. Unless a cure is found for Hep-V, poor sookie will need to start hunting for another non-human to share her bed. Animal, vegetable or mineral; Sookie ain’t the fussy sort.

True Blood
Created by
Alan Ball
Cast
Anna Paquin, Stephen Moyer, Sam Trammell, Ryan Kwanten, Chris Bauer, Kristin Bauer van Straten, Nelsan Ellis, Joe Manganiello, Deborah Ann Woll, Carrie Preston
Episode Release Date
20 July 2014
Ed’s Grade: B+

Even though there are countless people dead because of the crazed and infected vampires, everyone saw fit to give Alcide a sendoff in the shape of a party at Sookie’s house. Sookie is still trying to cope with her loss and the last thing she wants or needs is a house full of happy mourners. Nevertheless, that’s exactly what she gets thanks to Lafayette.

Much is revealed at the partay, with Bill having several flashbacks which I guess were designed to show how good he was in his pre-vamp days during the Civil War. After the writers establish his previous good nature, a shocked Bill learns of his infection when he looks in the mirror after taking a shower.

Even though it’s pretty inappropriate to be making marriage proposals at an event such as this, it doesn’t prevent Andy Bellefleur from asking Holly to be his lawfully wedded wife. Before Andy goes down on one knee, Jason quickly offers sound (and very funny) advice to Adilyn and Wade: “A word to the wise; I don’t know if you two are f*cking or not, but if you are, it’s gonna have to stop right now.” Andy’s proposal speech to Holly is heartfelt, but she tells him “yes!” before he even reaches the part where he asks “will you marry me?”


Just before Andy popped the question he went to Jessica who was standing outside due to her still feeling guilty. Andy makes up with Jessica telling her life’s too short, and that she should come in and join in the festivities. James is feeling neglected by Jessica and while he and Lafayette are out on the porch discussing James’ feelings, Lafayette asks him if the guy who turned James was also his boyfriend. It turns out he was.

Now that Jessica is free from her constant feeling of guilt, she goes looking for James to share some love. She finally finds James with Lafayette in a compromising position in their SUV. Shocked, Jessica runs to Jason and tells him what happened, resulting in Jason rescinding James’ invitation to the house. It’s not long before Jason and Jessica are following suit. Can you remember the first time the pair made love? It happened on Halloween night in season 4 episode 9 and you can watch it here.

While Sookie’s party is in full swing, Eric and Pam are hunting for Sarah Newlin. They start off at Fangtasia, where an angry Willa demands to be released from Eric if she agrees to tell him where to find Sarah. Eric does so and then learns Sarah has a vampire sister. This is the same sister Sarah told the world was killed by a vampire, and the reason she was trying to rid the world of the undead. When Eric and Pam find the vamp sister they discover she too has Hep-V, and she’s also very willing to help them kill Sarah. They travel to Dallas because Sarah’s parents are attending a political gala in honer of G W Bush. They have to get past the security, so Eric dons a suit and ten gallon hat, with Pam in a sparkly dress. Uttering another classic line, Pam complains “I look like a republic*nt.”

At the gala, Sarah finds her mother and begs her to hide her from the Yakuza, but she’s too late. while Pam and Eric are hunting for her at the gala the Yakuza arrive in numbers and start shooting up the place, killing everyone in their way, including Sarah’s mother. Just as they catch up to Sarah, she runs right into Eric in a slowed down scene, almost exactly like the one where Sarah Conner runs into Arnie while she’s escaping from the mental hospital in Terminator 2. Eric grabs her by the neck and begins to squeeze but he has to drop Sarah so he can kill the three Yakuza men who are about to shoot at him with automatic guns. Eric quickly kills two of them but the third he viciously rips his lower jaw off. That’s how it ends with Eric so we’ll need to wait for next week to see what’s in store for Sara. I can’t wait! You can watch the old Sarah Newlin from season 2 here.

I’m actually surprised at how good this episode was, with it bettering even last week’s. We have only five more to go but it’s shaping up to be as good as it was at the beginning. Let’s hope so!

by Ed Blackadder

Details for next week:

Episode #76: Karma

Debut: SUNDAY, JULY 27 (9:00-10:00 p.m. ET/PT)

Other HBO playdates: July 27 (11:30 p.m., 2:00 a.m.), 28 (11:50 p.m.), 29 (midnight) and 30 (8:30 p.m., 12:30 a.m.), and Aug. 1 (midnight)

HBO2 playdates: July 28 (9:00 p.m.) and 31 (5:00 a.m.), and Aug. 2 (9:00 p.m.), 3 (8:00 p.m.) and 24 (5:00 p.m.)

A shocking discovery forces Sookie (Anna Paquin) to reassess her recent involvement with Bill (Stephen Moyer). In Dallas, Eric (Alexander Skarsgård) and Pam (Kristin Bauer van Straten) forge an unlikely alliance in their hunt for a shared nemesis. Andy (Chris Bauer) bickers with Holly (Lauren Bowles) about their children’s behavior; Lafayette (Nelsan Ellis) shares a vision with Lettie Mae (Adina Porter); Jason (Ryan Kwanten) owns up to his true feelings about Violet (Karolina Wydra); Sam (Sam Trammell) finds himself in a quandary regarding Nicole (Jurnee Smollett-Bell).

Written by Angela Robinson; directed by Angela Robinson.

An Interview with Uwe Boll (II)

 

“I think most filmmakers are like actors – basically whores who sit there and wait till they can get paid to just direct or act. “ – Uwe Boll

 

 

 

by Jason Howard

Last year, right around this time, I had the pleasure to speak with Uwe Boll (1st interview here) – easily one of the most divisive and often derided, but also hardest working, filmmakers out there right now – about the release of his film Assault on Wall Street.  Now, as he gears up for the release of his latest film, a follow-up to 2011’s Rampage (easily one of his highest regarded films) entitled Rampage 2: Capital Punishment (review here), I sat down with the ever outspoken Boll again to discuss the new film, the oft-debated topic of gun control, and what the future holds for our country and his career.

Jason Howard:  What made you decide to revisit the world of Bill Williamson? Did you always intend for Rampage to have a follow-up?

Uwe Boll:  People liked the first Rampage and I just had a feeling the story of Bill was not finished.

JH:  Bill offers up quite a bit of political commentary in the film – how much of his viewpoint is directly lifted from your own?

UB:  Everything that Bill says about politics is my opinion.  We all get brainwashed and we don’t live in a democracy. But, his violent solution is not necessarily the way I would change the world.

JH:  Because the first film received some of the best reviews of your career, was there a pressure to deliver bigger and better with the second one?

UB:  No …but we had to deliver different and show that something happened with Bill in the two years he was in hiding after the first massacre …..A real development.  Brendan (Fletcher) was also not really interested in the beginning in playing Bill again, but when I presented the new story, he felt that that new movie is really NEW and not just a second part duplicating the first.

JH:  The first Rampage certainly stirred up a bit of controversy due to its subject matter and the new one is sure to do the same.  Do you enjoy pushing the boundaries when making your films?

UB:  Yes.  I think real political, radical movies are not coming from the studios and I should do them because the other filmmakers are more into art and personal stories ….I love movies attacking the status quo.

JH:  There’s a definite statement in the two films regarding gun control.  With the type of fictional events that occur in your films becoming more and more of a reality, where do you feel we’re going wrong in the field of gun control?

UB:  The only people who should get a gun license are those who go to a 2 day course learning to handle a gun, safety etc…and then they get the license AFTER the police cleared them. This is how I got my license in Canada.  In general, OPEN CARRY is absurd because nobody besides cops and security people need to have a gun and especially running around in public with the gun.

JH:  Do you feel that gun violence in public places seems to be becoming more rampant?  Or is it just because we, as an audience, have a bit of a fascination with this type of news, so it gets reported more often?

UB:  In Mexico, the drug cartel kills 30,000 people a year.  In the USA, 11,000 people get shot.  The availability of guns leads to more murder cases. In England, only 300 people get murdered every year.  In regards to the school shootings or recently the veterans running amok, I think psychological problems, drug abuse and the availability of guns together lead to the large amount of victims….

JH:  Do you feel, with bullying being a cause of many of these instances, that social media plays a big part in the problem?

UB:  I think the kids of today learn from early on that money and good looks are everything, and if you don’t find both, or at least one of those ideals, you are a loser. If you have a no-name wardrobe on in school and not named brands; if you have a shitty cellphone and not an iPhone – you turn into an outsider and this is very bad….   But, I still think that you have to be mentally ill to run amok. To be lonely or isolated is not enough to get a gun and start shooting everybody.

Look at that example of the son of that assistant director in LA.  He is a perfect example of somebody who mixed up virtual internet reality with his real life.  He had an entitlement problem, together with depression, drugs and the availability of guns. Any weapon store who sold the guns to him should get fined because you could see in his face that this guy is not normal.

JH:  What do you see as a possible solution?

UB:  Better schools and family life.  Less shopping and spending money. More outdoor playing for kids and strict gun rules.

JH:  Rampage 2 certainly also makes a statement about the news media’s involvement in a lot of these actions.  Do you feel their glamorization of real-life violence and willingness to put being first to report things above actually being factual, contributes to the problem as a whole?

UB:  TV wants good ratings, and so the downward spiral starts. The programs get more stupid by the minute. It makes it cooler and easier to be connected to half criminals because we see them as stars in reality TV.  Look at The Bachelor or the Housewife shows – a bunch of stupid wannabes and yet young adults love them as their role-models. In those shows, it always looks that money is just there and nobody has to work for a living. Spoiled retards like Justin Bieber or Miley Cyrus should not be the heroes of our kids.

JH:  You also recently made the third film in the In The Name of the King series.  Do you enjoy doing those types of pieces as much as you do your more personal films, or are they more of a means to finance the films you’d really like to make?

UB:  This movie makes other movies happen. Of course, I’m more interested in my political movies like Assault on Wall Street, Darfur, Rampage, Stoic, etc…..

JH:  The current era of your career has been loaded with films that make a powerful statement about some rather tough and important issues.  Do you think that, because of the audiences that come with films, filmmakers should have a bigger responsibility to be more topical?

UB:  I don’t think films have an automatic built-in audience.  Only big franchises and remakes have a built-in audience. It is so much harder to get an audience with political movies. I think most filmmakers are like actors – basically whores who sit there and wait till they can get paid to just direct or act.

JH:  Because you are tackling more complex issues lately, do you find that your years of experience makes it easier?  Maybe not having to worry as much about the technical side of things opens the process up to focus on the issues?

UB:  Absolutely.  Me and my DP, Mathias, can structure a full movie shoot on one dog walk. We don’t have to talk anymore about set ups and we shoot very fast.  I’m also very happy with that more modern handheld documentary approach and the Red Epic or Alexa Cameras. Digital now is looking so good and so much faster to shoot with than 35mm.  I’ve made over 30 movies – a lot with action and CGI.  If I read a script, I know how long it will take me to shoot it.

JH:  On the opposite end of the spectrum, several of your films, including Postal and Blubberella, are played more for laughs and are quite a bit of fun.  As a director, does your approach differ when working on films along those lines?

UB:  Postal was my favorite shoot of all time, and I love the movie from A to Z. Blubberella, I think, is 50% funny and 50% a total disaster which makes it maybe also funny.  But, Postal is well written and perfectly acted.  Blubberella is trash.  But, of course it is a lot of fun to make a comedy ….

JH:  I don’t know – I’d probably put Blubberella at a 55/45 funny-to-disaster split…  Lastly, you seem to always be working – can you give us an idea of what films might be coming up next for you?

UB:  Coming up, I have a Viking movie, a great thriller called 12 Hours and I want to finish the Rampage story with Rampage 3…

And, there it is.  Whether you love his movies, or you saw Alone in the Dark and wanted to step into the boxing ring with him (an actual possibility), there’s no denying that Uwe Boll is one of the most prolific filmmakers around.  Heck, during the time it took you to read this interview, he wrapped up production on another three flicks that you’re going to complain about in a couple of months.  The moral?  Every time you sit down to read, a sequel to In the Name of the King is made.  Do you see what you’ve done?  But, the reality is that Boll also happens to be one of the most passionate filmmakers I’ve ever had the opportunity to speak to and, whether you like the end result or not, many of his films tackle subjects that others would be unwilling to touch.  He does what he wants with what he loves – isn’t that something we’d all like to say?  Make sure to check out Rampage 2: Capital Punishment when it’s released on DVD and VOD in the U.S. on August 19, 2014, followed by a Canadian release on October 21st (hey, don’t feel bad Canadians – we get Uwe Boll movies quicker, but you guys get the whole Universal Health Care thing, so let’s call it even.  Canado-American war has been averted once again).

11/07/14

10 Films That Helped Define Cinema (List)

 

“For a film to make this list, it had to be a film that broke barriers or discussed a taboo subject. After these films, writers and directors no longer had to follow a production code.”
 

 

by Paul Booth

For a film to make this list, it had to be a film that broke barriers or discussed a taboo subject. After these films, writers and directors no longer had to follow a production code. After these films–although the studios did make them–the days of censoring filmmakers was over. It was now up to the audience to decide to see a movie or not. The list is not about stars, or meant to only mention Oscar-winning films. This list is a reflection on America’s conservatism changing (content, not Politics).

1) The Lost Weekend (1945)

The 1945 Best Picture was the first film to deal with alcoholism. This controversial film held nothing back as it examined the effects of alcohol on the lead character. The studios thought it may be too depressing, but it struck a chord with America and also snagged Best Director for Billy Wilder (Some Like it Hot).

2) Gentleman’s Agreement (1946)

The fearless head (and co-Founder of 20th Century Fox Studios) Daryl F. Zanuck would use Gregory Peck in the story of a journalist who goes on an undercover assignment to expose anti-semitism. The film was released within a few years of the Holocaust. Once again, story and guts prevailed, bringing Zanuck a Best Picture Oscar.

3) The Pawnbroker (1962)

This film broke the rules by showing flashbacks of the Holocaust in the memory of its main character played by Rod Steiger.  In a despicable time when some doubted the Holocaust even happened, this film was big no-no. The film’s director Sidney Lumet (12 Angry Men) pushed the censorship rules with scenes of internment camps and barking dogs. Aside from the subject matter, the film is also worth noting, as the beginning of Quincy Jones career as a film composer.

4) The Graduate (1967)

The Graduate told the story of a young man sleeping with an older woman (taboo with a capital T in those days). The arrival of Dustin Hoffman and second time director Mike Nichols was perfect for this legendary film that has influenced almost every filmmaker since it was made.

5) In the Heat of the Night (1967)

Not only was it the Best Picture winner, but it boldly examined racism in the South and was released at America’s peak of Civil Rights and racial tension. The scene that terrorized conservative audiences was when Sidney Poitier slapped a Police officer. That was fine, the problem was that Poitier was black and the cop wasn’t. This film is a grim reminder of how sick this country was in 1968.

6) Easy Rider (1969)

The heroes of the film are drug-dealing hippies with long hair. The brilliant cinematography and changing times launched this film from B-movie biker flick to a landmark in American cinema. One of the first movies made outside the studio, although released by Columbia. Some historians argue this was one of the films to birth Independent cinema. At the time Jack Nicholson was not Jack Nicholson.

7) Midnight Cowboy (1969)

The first movie to win Best Picture with an X-rating. Jon Voight (Coming Home) plays Joe Buck, a man who heads to NYC from Texas and quickly ends up down on his luck and must become a male prostitute. It could not have stirred more guff, because it treated gay men with humanity.

8) The Wild Bunch (1969)

This film with its machine guns and blood, broke down any question of is a film too violent? After The Wild Bunch there was no more censoring violence and any good film with violence owes The Wild Bunch a thank you. We also have this film to thank for the never-ending debate of “do movies cause real violence?”

9) Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Hollywood was riding high on box-office giants like Jaws and Star Wars and before the industry turned into an ’80s greed festival (like everything in America), the business awarded Best Picture to the first film to deal with Divorce. This is the film that faced what a crumbling marriage and custody battle can do to a man, woman and child. Oscar wins for Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep.

10) Philadelphia (1993)

It was about time, after just over a decade of the AIDS epidemic it was finally being acknowledge as a disease anyone could have, not only gay people. The studio allowed Tom Hanks to play a dying AIDS patient who is wrongfully terminated from his law firm and decides to sue his former bosses. His lawyer is Denzel Washington (Training Day) in the only on-screen bigot character I have ever tolerated his opinions. Denzel played a gay-intolerant heterosexual man who must understand AIDS and himself. This is one of Denzel’s best performances, even though Hanks (and an Oscar win) is what most people remember about Philadelphia.

Latest Movie News & Reviews:

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (Review)

Dawn

  “Minor quibbles aside, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is an absolutely thrilling, entertaining, and affecting entry into the summer movie season.”       by Jason Howard Behold of The Beginning of My Review of The Dawn of The Planet of The Apes. [...]

[ Read More ]

Jersey Boys (Review)

Jersey Boys tL2iILHUsG0

“Jersey Boys is a real treat on the big screen.”           Review by Steve Pulaski Clint Eastwood’s Jersey Boys is about what you’d expect from a biopic concerning the formation, rise, and eventual demise of the pop and rock vocal group [...]

[ Read More ]

22 Jump Street

22 Jum

“It’s hard to see anyone who enjoyed the first Jump Street a great deal be disappointed by this effort.” I still find Hollywood’s approach to a 21 Jump Street film adaptation, and what looks to be a promising franchise at the moment, quite hilarious and [...]

[ Read More ]

The Fault in Our Stars

Fault

“The film’s target demographic – teenage girls – are likely to eat this up, but for those looking for more substantial romantic fare, this is mainstream American romance cinema playing dressup in independent romance cinema and foreign romance cinema’s clothes.” The immediate fault in The [...]

[ Read More ]

Bilocation (Review)

Bilocation NxAPx-lguL0

  “One would expect a great deal more from such a tantalizing premise, but the resulting narrative eventually falls back on hackneyed, more-of-same J-Horror”       by Nav Qateel Based on Haruka Hojo’s novel of the same name, Bilocation tells the story of Shinobu [...]

[ Read More ]

True Blood: Season 7, Episode 5 (Recap)

TBlood7 iu3Tw4-pKg4

Lost Cause (Spoiler Warning) This week’s episode of True Blood had a decent mix of everything, as one would expect at the midway point of the final season. It managed to cover all the bases in an attempt at pleasing everyone and at that it [...]

[ Read More ]

Mean Girls: The Reunion 2014 (Trailer)

Mean2

The new trailer for Mean Girls: The Reunion is finally here! Or is it? After the unexpected success of Mark Waters’ Mean Girls in 2004, the powers that be decided to cash in on the popular and recognisable name in the hope of recreating the [...]

[ Read More ]

The Purge: Anarchy (Review)

Purge2

  “The Purge: Anarchy improves on the original in almost every single way, while somehow still managing to not be very good, however, I’d still be willing to give a third film a shot”       by Jason Howard On the night of the [...]

[ Read More ]

Planes: Fire & Rescue (Review)

Planes Fire

  “Characters are one-dimensional archetypes, clearly boasting their celebrity voices more than their personalities”       by Steve Pulaski The arrival of Disney’s (not Pixar’s) Planes: Fire & Rescue, the sequel to last year’s modest box office hit Planes, comes a lot quicker than [...]

[ Read More ]

Cross Bearer (Review)

Cross Bearer 5jRPmnBexGs

  “Cross Bearer wallows in its seamier aspects and turns up the volume when it comes time for a hammer claw to extract itself from flesh after a kill.”     by Rob Rector There are many things you can overlook as a film reviewer [...]

[ Read More ]

Monster (Review)

Monster

  “Monster may well suffer from an identity crisis, but when it focuses on lead man Lee Min-Ki’s character Tae-Soo, one can forgive the quirky nature of the story.”     by Nav Qateel Ik-Sang is tasked by his boss to pay off a blackmailer [...]

[ Read More ]

Hidden Treasures: TV Teleplays

Playhouse

  Some hidden TV treasures from the 1950s are just waiting to be re-discovered.       by Martin Hafer Back in the late 1940s and through the 1950s, television was an exciting new medium and America was hooked.  Some of the TV shows from [...]

[ Read More ]

Martin’s, You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet! – The Apology King

Apology King o7tOHI3USBA

Hello, and welcome to another edition of You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet! My series of review-articles are not necessarily the greatest films in movie history, but all of them are most memorable. I like to think of them as a celebration of the strangest films [...]

[ Read More ]

Under the Dome: Season 2, Ep 3 (Recap)

Under the Dome

Force Majeure (Spoiler Warning!) The plot thickens in Chester’s Mill as we learn a bit more about the season 2 newcomers. Instead of Big Jim being the dome’s answer to David Koresh, it looks like it’s actually the town barber Lyle Chumley (Dwight Yoakam) who’s [...]

[ Read More ]

Hercules Reborn (Review)

Hercules Reborn

  “It shows a bit more quality and is more watchable than I ever would have expected from The Asylum.”       by Martin Hafer Hercules Reborn is a production of The Asylum—a film production company known for making so-called ‘mockbusters’.  These mockbusters are [...]

[ Read More ]

True Blood: Season 7, Episode 4 (Recap)

TBlood7 iu3Tw4-pKg4

Death Is Not the End (Spoiler Warning) I would have to say this episode has been the best of the season so far and it’s also looking a bit like it used to be. I don’t know if it was because of the flashbacks and [...]

[ Read More ]

Life Itself (Review)

Life Itself z4SgwBRq-fU

  “James is all encompassing with Life Itself, tirelessly trying to capture everything that occurred in Ebert’s life”       by Steve Pulaski “When did you first want to become a film critic?” is the question I get asked the most, second only to [...]

[ Read More ]

Summer’s Shadow (Review)

summer's shadow

  “[Summer's Shadow is] sweet and enjoyable for the kids with enough to it that the parents won’t start to get bored.”       by Martin Hafer Sometimes when you critique films, it’s nice to see a very simple and undemanding film–one that has [...]

[ Read More ]

An Interview with Uwe Boll (II)

Uwe Boll 02

  “I think most filmmakers are like actors – basically whores who sit there and wait till they can get paid to just direct or act. “ – Uwe Boll       by Jason Howard Last year, right around this time, I had the pleasure [...]

[ Read More ]

The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart (Review)

Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart v7VHN4hGlk4

  Amazingly odd…and probably not a CGI film that younger kids would enjoy.       by Martin Hafer Originally, Jack and the Cuckoo-Clock Heart (AKA The Boy with the Cuckoo-Clock Heart) was a French-language film. However, a recent English dub has been completed and [...]

[ Read More ]

Something Good: The Mercury Factor (Review)

Something Good Acr8BkyoOZQ

  “Overall, there is some stuff to like in this film but the story is just very weak.”       by Martin Hafer This film is directed, co-written and stars the Italian-Uruguayan actor, Luca Barbareschi. And, incidentally, aside from acting, writing and directing, Barbareschi [...]

[ Read More ]

Under the Dome: Season 2, Ep 2 (Recap)

Under the Dome

Infestation – Recap (Spoiler Warning!) It looks like Big Jim Rennie is serious about becoming Chester’s Mill answer to David Koresh, and he now has the residents looking up to him once again. Barbie and Julia can see it for what it really is but [...]

[ Read More ]

True Blood: Season 7, Episode 3 (Recap)

TBlood7 iu3Tw4-pKg4

Fire in the Hole (Spoiler Warning) This was an improvement over last week’s episode, with more regulars dying but some returning. Sarah Newlin has always been an entertaining character and bringing her back should liven things up. It certainly livened up a dying Eric Northman, [...]

[ Read More ]

Choose a Category

Advertisement:

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Keep in mind, we may update multiple times daily.

Advertisements

AdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisementAdvertisement

Follow us on Twitter

Recent Comments

  • Ed Blackadder: I stand corrected! I can't believe I got that wrong. I was n...
  • Gavin Croucher: Your memory is obviously faulty because as everybody knows -...
  • Nav Qateel: I tried to diversify as much as possible and this is the res...
  • Martin Hafer: While perhaps not ESSENTIAL, I loved his "Zebraman" and also...
  • Martin Hafer: I appreciate your comment, though am a bit horrified that th...

The Latest from Jason Howard

Purge2
The Purge: Anarchy (Review)

  "The Purge: Anarchy improves on the original in almost every single way, while somehow still managing to not be More→

Uwe Boll 02
An Interview with Uwe Boll (II)

  "I think most filmmakers are like actors - basically whores who sit there and wait till they can get paid to just More→

The Latest from Nav Qateel

Bilocation NxAPx-lguL0
Bilocation (Review)

  "One would expect a great deal more from such a tantalizing premise, but the resulting narrative eventually falls Continue→

Monster
Monster (Review)

  "Monster may well suffer from an identity crisis, but when it focuses on lead man Lee Min-Ki's character Tae-Soo, Continue→

The Latest from Steve Pulaski

Planes Fire
Planes: Fire & Rescue (Review)

  "Characters are one-dimensional archetypes, clearly boasting their celebrity voices more than their More→

Life Itself z4SgwBRq-fU
Life Itself (Review)

  "James is all encompassing with Life Itself, tirelessly trying to capture everything that occurred in Ebert's More→

Reviews from Ed Blackadder

TBlood7 iu3Tw4-pKg4
True Blood: Season 7, Episode 5 (Recap)

Lost Cause (Spoiler Warning) This week's episode of True Blood had a decent mix of everything, Read More→

Under the Dome
Under the Dome: Season 2, Ep 3 (Recap)

Force Majeure (Spoiler Warning!) The plot thickens in Chester's Mill as we learn a bit more Read More→

The Latest from Rob Rector

Cross Bearer 5jRPmnBexGs
Cross Bearer (Review)

  "Cross Bearer wallows in its seamier aspects and turns up the volume when it comes time for a hammer claw to Continue→

Killer Legends (2014) IhCYLuUygRY
Killer Legends (Review)

            by Rob Rector Filmmakers Joshua Zeman and Rachel Mills Continue→

Recent articles from Bethany Rose

The Bunnyman Massacre eNbal4zI4k8
The Bunnyman Massacre (Review)

“Writer/director Carl Lindbergh actually creates a new villain to entertain Continue→

Reason Dirs
An Interview with Directors Andrew Schrader & Jordan Harris

I recently interviewed filmmakers Andrew Schrader and Jordan Harris about their newest film, The Age of Reason (read my Continue→

Advertisement:

Honda's Project Drive-In

Check it out!

Check it out!
Martin’s 100 Most Overrated Films, Part 1
Martin’s 100 Most Overrated Films, Part 1

Great reviews, interviews, articles and more!

Check out this week’s feature from Influx Magazine!

Read Article

In the Spotlight:

In the Spotlight:
An Interview with Yvonne Strahovski
An Interview with Yvonne Strahovski

Great interviews.

Great articles.

Great reviews.

We’ve got it all on INFLUX Magazine.

Get the insight you want from our writers!

Read More

Brian's Brain: Stark v. Kennedy

Hot on Influx Magazine:

Hot on Influx Magazine:
An Interview with Actor William Sadler
An Interview with Actor William Sadler

From established A-listers to up-and-comers, from the names you know, to the names you will know, read INFLUX the latest Influx Interviews.

Need more?

We have more.

Continue!

Influx Magazine Presents:

Influx Magazine Presents:
King Lear (Theatre)
King Lear (Theatre)

Check out this featured article from Influx Magazine.

We bring you great articles, exclusive interviews and the latest reviews.

Continue

Influx Exclusive Interview:

Influx Exclusive Interview:
An Interview with Actor Crispin Glover
An Interview with Actor Crispin Glover

INFLUX Interviews offer unique insight into the world of actors, directors, producers, musicians and many others in the various worlds of entertainment.

Check out our latest interviews and enjoy!

Continue

INFLUX Interviews

Uwe Boll 02
An Interview with Uwe Boll (II)

  "I think most filmmakers are like actors - basically whores who sit there and wait till they can get paid to just More→

AEckhart
An Interview with Aaron Eckhart

He was the antagonist to Batman in The Dark Knight! He's portrayed the President of the United States in Olympus has Fallen! More→

Alan Bagh jE5dJDgZ644
An Interview with Actor Alan Bagh (Star of ‘Birdemic: Shock and Terror’)

  An interview with Alan Bagh, star of cult B-movie Birdemic: Shock and Terror. Birdemic is currently the number 2 More→

YS1
An Interview with Yvonne Strahovski

She's immediately recognizable from her role on Dexter as Hannah and is a major player in the 24: Live Another Day More→

Coogan
An Interview with Actor Keith Coogan

I recently had the pleasure to sit and talk with lifelong actor Keith Coogan.  Notably recognizable for two of his most More→

Reason Dirs
An Interview with Directors Andrew Schrader & Jordan Harris

I recently interviewed filmmakers Andrew Schrader and Jordan Harris about their newest film, The Age of Reason (read my More→

Everybody Loves a List!

10 Supporting actors
10 Movies with Supporting Actor Oscar Nominees (List)

On many lists they concentrate on only the winners. Here, attention is drawn to the performances that helped escalate a More→

Changed Cinema
10 Films That Helped Define Cinema (List)

  "For a film to make this list, it had to be a film that broke barriers or discussed a taboo subject. After these More→

Miike2
5 Essential Takashi Miike Films (List)

  "If you find you enjoy any two from this list, then it should be safe to assume you'll enjoy many Miike More→

s2Member®