Amazingly good considering that so many folks who made this film are relatively unknown…but very talented.

by Martin Hafer

As Supremacy opens, you see a message that says this story is based on a real case. I did a bit of research and could find nothing about it–but it sure left me wanting to know more. The opening scene is just outside a prison and Garrett Tully (Joe Anderson) has been released. A women he doesn’t know is there to pick him up, and obviously some sort of wicked plan is uniting them.

Supremacy
Directed by
Deon Taylor
Cast
Joe Anderson, Dawn Olivieri, Derek Luke
Release Date
30 January 2015
Martin’s Grade: A-

Before too long, their pickup truck is stopped by the police and Tully panics and kills the cop. They flee and soon take refuge in a home full of people. The choice of homes is ironic, considering that Tully is an avowed white supremacist–and their captives are a black family. Through the rest of the film, you see Tully and his female accomplice terrorize the family and you wonder if any of these people are going to end up alive by the end of the story.

As you can tell by my description that this film has a very simple plot. However, it makes the most of it and is an awfully well made film considering its humble pedigree. Director Deon Taylor and writer Eric J. Adams are relative newbies to filmmaking. And, apart from Danny Glover who plays the family patriarch, the actors are mostly folks who may be unknown to the viewer. But it all works so well. In particular, the acting of Anderson as the kidnapper, Lela Rochon (Odessa, the mother) and Glover (Mr. Walker) are really superb and make the story seem quite real.


This is not a perfect film but it is far better than I’d expected it to be. The ending alone is more than enough reason to watch the film. It has a few violent scenes, one sexual encounter and a ton of language that might just make you blush. While the language certainly help to give this one an R rating here in the States, I appreciated how the film avoided being politically correct–and used extremely vivid and offensive racial epithets and stereotypes. After all, racism is ugly and here it is shown in all its ugliness.

Well done and worth seeing.